illustration-mobility-30.jpg

On-Demand Mobility

What if you could stop relying on your second car to get to work or drive your kids to places?

Research, Strategy, Service Design, ux and visual

Mobility service for suburbia and rural areas

divider-mobility@2x.png
 

At IXDS, I helped to research and prototype a service that gives people a way out of the struggles of urbanization by leveraging the capabilities of on-demand and autonomous public transportation. Who knows – owning a second car might soon not be a necessity anymore.

 
 
 Picture of the result
 
 

Key challenges

 
 

— Uncover in which situations car owners were willing to switch to a ride sharing offering to estimate demand.

— Design a prototype of the service that is coherent across the app and vehicle that minimizes the time needed to order a ride and eases the transition from single to regular booking. 

 
 

 

How it works

 

Customers can schedule regular rides and pick-ups for themselves and their loved ones to avoid the stress of their daily commute. 

A coherent service experience across the mobile app, SMS-channel, vehicle and web takes the hassle out of carpooling.

It enables car owners and children to enjoy the comfort of on-demand ride-sharing. 

My role

My involvement in this project spanned all phases of the design process. Besides developing a framework for user research for an extensive team of six researchers and conducting qualitative interviews at homes of potential users, I was responsible for leading the interaction and visual design efforts of the mobile and web touch-points. These were prototyped and tested using Google's Design Sprint method.

 
 
illustration-mobility-20.gif
 
 
 
illustration-mobility-30.jpg
 
 All choices have been reduced to offer a simple starting experience that the

SIMPLE START

The initial view has been simplified to help the user schedule a ride with ease.

illustration-mobility-50.jpg

Smart placement of additional features

Search suggestions are used to reveal additional functionality elegantly. Users can save their home and work location and schedule a regular pick-up.

 
 
 
 
illustration-mobility-60.jpg

One, two, booked

Only two steps are necessary to book a ride.

illustration-mobility-70.jpg

Options

Users can ride alone, with others or indicate that they need special assistance with their baggage or a wheelchair. Necessary waiting times are indicated.

 
 
 
illustration-mobility-80.jpg

No line numbers or colors

Buses are identified with names instead of line numbers, so that people can remember their ride more easily.

illustration-mobility-90.jpg

Turn the first ride into a routine

The ticket drawer allows users to find their booked rides and book return trips easily. Planning a routine pick-up is only a tap away.

 
 

 

Research

 

6 researchers visited 3 cities to conduct over 35 interviews with citizens, city transportation experts and operational staff in order to understand the suburban dependency on cars—and how it can be circumvented. 

My role

I helped coordinate and design a research framework and interview guidelines our team used to talk to customers whose habitual use of personal vehicles seemingly didn't allow for alternatives. My involvement throughout the entire analysis and synthesis process helped the team to review the research material critically, focus on causality and discern between stated and revealed preferences. This helped us to uncover where people were looking for progress and how we could help them. 

 
 
illustration-mobility-105@2x.png
 
 
 
 Card sorting at the end of each interview helped us to assess the different priorities people had when they chose a car or a public transportation service. We compared these stated preferences with the behavior we uncovered in interviews to reveal contradictions.

Card sorting at the end of each interview helped us to assess the different priorities people had when they chose a car or a public transportation service. We compared these stated preferences with the behavior we uncovered in interviews to reveal contradictions.

 Besides consumers, we interviewed experts such as this dispatcher to uncover barriers to transformation of the processes needed to establish an on-demand service.

Besides consumers, we interviewed experts such as this dispatcher to uncover barriers to transformation of the processes needed to establish an on-demand service.

 
 
“Us mothers need to run around our kids the whole day, pick them up, bring them everywhere, shop groceries and so on. You can only do it with a car.”
— Mother of two, structuring her schedule around driving her kids as she is trying to be good parent that doesn't limit her children's mobility.
 
 
 
 
 This contextual persona explains how a group of elderly habitually avoids using a "senior bus" offering provided by the city and what a new solution needs to consider.

Contextual personas

To reduce ambiguity and explain customer behavior in-depth, I structured personas around struggles that customers experienced in certain situations, rather than loosely mentioning unrelated information such as attitudes, preferences or demographics.

The example on the left shows that some elderly people abandoned using the city's senior bus offering, and regularly hired cabs instead. The persona explains what led them to this choice and what progress they were trying to make, providing an opportunity for our offering.

 
 
 

Job Stories

Similar to User Stories, Job Stories are a tool to convey information in a formalized manner. We used them to structure our insights as short design briefs. The stories on the right describe the struggles and needs of commuters.

 Persona
 
 
 
 User Journey

Service blueprint and user journey

We used a variety of storytelling and planning tools, among them the service blueprint on the left which kicked off a backlog planning session.